News

New Lay-Flat Powder Chemistry, And Improved Film!

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Our Df96 Monobath and Cs41 2-Bath Color Kit can now ship in First-Class/Priority mail envelopes, not regulated for transport. Save up to 75% on shipping rates!
We have some very exciting news for those of you who don't like to pay to ship Earth's most abundant resource around the world! Introducing, CineStill Powder Chemistry! Just add WATER, and you've got a black & white monobath or 2-bath color processing.

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Artist Spotlight: Maarten Groen

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We first discovered Maarten Groen on Instagram and quickly became huge fans of his stunning work. Shooting almost exclusively CineStill Film, he recently self published a book of images shot on our film!

For this spotlight, we simply asked Maarten to talk about shooting impactful still photographs alongside his work as a film director. Thank you Maarten for supporting CineStill and for being such a beautiful part of our film community!

Hi, I’m Maarten Groen and I’m an analog addict...

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Introducing: °Cs "Temperature Control System", TCS-1000 Immersion Circulator Thermostat For Mixing Chemistry and Precision Film Processing

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The biggest deterrents to at home film processing have been controlling temperature and handling chemistry. We already simplified the process with our Cs41 kits and now the Df96 Monobath, but over the past two years we have refined a system which is efficient and easy to use. Inspired by affordable kitchen appliances, cooking thermostats and even a foot-spa, which were themselves inspired by costly laboratory tools for scientific thermoregulation, we have now come full circle. An affordable immersion circulator thermostat for home laboratory use.

Developing film at home just got a whole lot simpler with the CineStill TCS-1000 Immersion Circulator Thermostat. Whether you are developing black and white, color negative, or slide film, this system allows you to efficiently and easily mix your chemistry, heat it up to the precise processing temperature, and maintain it during the entire developing session. Finally, the at home film processing solution for the modern film photographer.

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Artist Spotlight: Ethan Gulley - Desert & Denim

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Alabama-born and California based photographer Ethan Gulley first popped onto our radar with his bold commercial and editorial photography, and as founder of the independent publication Sonder Mag.
Ethan recently packed up a bag full of CineStill Film and headed to Joshua Tree to document Desert & Denim, a festival for entrepreneurs, artisans and idealists. The results are stunning, with a palpable sense of western nostalgia and craft flair. Thanks for taking us along on your adventure, Ethan!

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No Compromises - Df96 compared with popular traditional developers

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Due to the long history of multiple bath processes being the only ones available, many may wonder, "What are the compromises with a monobath?" Well, we can tell you that it is not compromised quality with Df96. We are standing on the shoulders of giants, and the reason monobaths weren't popular before is most likely because of economies of scale and cost, in addition to shorter shelf life. In the past, there was more profit in just producing the large volume photochemicals for film to be processed en masse. After all, back then everyone had to process film to capture a photo. Now that craft film manufacturing is being tooled for smaller batches, lower volume products can be more viable. Small batch, on demand, chemical manufacturing works just like craft beer. Fresher product with more characteristics. Thus the modern monobath was born, formulated to be produced at a craft scale.

Df96 is very forgiving for all film speeds and different emulsion types. This is partially because of the advanced developing agents used. But also as chemical development self-completes, archival fixation takes over breaking down silver and allowing physical development to redeposit it in thin areas of the film, while diffusing the grain to be finer and smoother. As you can see in the samples below, it renders somewhere between the Ilfotec DDX grain structure and Kodak Professional HC-110 tonality.

Detail crop of BwXX processed at ISO 250 in HC-110 liquid concentrate, Df96 monobath, and D-76 powder chemicals.

Detail crop of BwXX processed at ISO 250 in DD-X liquid concentrate, Df96 monobath, and ID-11 powder chemicals. 

Df96 also works well with tabular grain films, like Tmax, but to fully eliminate residual color dyes in the emulsion we double the recommended processing time. This does not affect the image since all films complete development within the first 3 minutes. Below you can see the smoothness and crisp contrast Df96 pulls out of TMax100...

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