News — chemistry

No Compromises - Cs6 3-Bath Process vs. E6 6-Bath Processing

Posted by CineStill on

With the Cs6 "Creative Slide" process the number of processing baths for E-6 film is reduced from 6 to 3. The reversal step occurs during color development in a Color&Reversal bath, and the pre-bleach, bleach steps are combined with the fixing step in a Bleaches&Fixer bath. People often wonder, "What are the compromises with combined processing baths?", such as the Cr6 "Color&Reversal" 2-In-1 Slide Solution or the Bf6 "Bleaches&Fixer" 3-In-1 Slide Solution. The reality is that there are no compromises between fresh Cs6 and carefully replenished E-6 chemistry. 

Just see for yourself! We bracketed exposures of an extreme lighting situation just before sunset, with cool skylight and warm backlight. Snip tests were made and processed in each of our 1st developers at 104ºf and the remaining 2 Cs6 baths at ~85-100ºf in a Patterson tank. The remaining film was sent to The Darkroom photo lab and processed with the 6-bath E-6 process. The Darkroom specializes in professional film developing and scanning. Their Sitte Tischer TruTrak dip & dunk processor maintains high professional standards with constant process control standards. All frames were scanned on the Skier Sunray Box with a Canon 5D mk2 with all the same settings and corrections.

Kodak Ektachrome E100 with an Olympus Zuiko 50mm at f/2 bracketed 1 stop over and under.

There is a lot of conjecture and skepticism out there regarding the archival stability and efficacy of "hobby" type chemistry kits, especially when it comes to slide processing. Some rationalize that, "Professional labs must prefer the 6-bath E-6 process because it is superior." or posit, "Why then don't pro labs use combined processing baths like blix?" Well, that is not the whole story...

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Latitude for Days - D9 DynamicChrome vs. E6 Dynamic-Range

Posted by CineStill on

D9 “DynamicChrome” Warm-Tone Dynamic 1st Developer renders approximately 9+ stops of usable dynamic-range while maintaining rich warm-tones and vibrant color-contrast with preserved highlight and shadow detail (optimized for scanning) for a more cinematic look. Mixed stock solution can be measured out at 1/2 the tank capacity and diluted 1+1 with water to make a working solution for normal warm-tone development. Dilute 1+2 or 1+3 with water for further preserved highlight detail and a more neutral-tone daylight color balance.

But is extending the dynamic range of slides really possible? Of course! That's why we are so excited. When a piece of emulsion is struck by light, trace amounts of silver harden. It would take an insane amount of overexposure to reach the maximum density of the emulsion. But in order to make the hardened silver visible it needs to be amplified with a developer. If you develop it past the Dmax of the film you will lose detail. The key is to slow down development in the highlights while developing the shadows enough to be visible. While it is difficult to increase the shadow detail that is exposed below the base fog of the film, without eliminating it's beautiful inky blacks, we have harnessed the highlight latitude of slide film beyond imagination.

We bracketed exposures by 2 stops under to show how many stops of additional dynamic-range are retained in the highlights. Snip tests were made and processed in each D9 dilution at 104ºf and the remaining 2 Cs6 baths at ~85-100ºf in a Patterson tank. The remaining film was sent to The Darkroom photo lab and processed with the 6-bath E-6 process. The Darkroom specializes in professional film developing and scanning. Their Sitte Tischer TruTrak dip & dunk processor maintains high professional standards with constant process control standards. All frames were scanned on the Skier Sunray Box with a Canon 5D mk2 with all the same settings and corrections.

E-6 Dynamic-Range vs. D9 DynamicChrome

Kodak Ektachrome E100 with an Olympus Zuiko 50mm at f/8 bracketed 2 stops.

D9 DynamicChrome Dilutions Comparison

Kodak Ektachrome E100 with an Olympus Zuiko 50mm at f/8 bracketed 2 stops.

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New D96 and F96 Powder 2-Bath Chemistry!

Posted by CineStill on

We are proud to introduce two brand new additions to the CineStill Chemistry Catalog: "D96” Powder B&W Motion Picture Developer, and "F96” the world’s only Powder Rapid Fixer for B&W + Bleach-Bypass Color Film!

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Introducing: DF96 “DEVELOPER&FIX” SINGLE-STEP - B&W MONOBATH PROCESSING

Posted by CineStill on

Developing black and white film just got a whole lot simpler with the CineStill Df96 Monobath. The worries of too much development, dilution, time or agitation are gone. Stop bath? Fixer? Hardener? Gone the way of One-Hour-Photos and formaldehyde. Finally, foolproof at home film processing. 

Many of the pitfalls and hazards of a multi-bath process are eliminated with this ready-to-use single-step solution, such as improper dilution, over-agitation, bubble marks, surge marks, etc. Over-processing is impossible, because the fixing action overtakes chemical development while aiding physical development, creating better image uniformity and finer grain negatives.

Monobath solutions were first proposed as far back as 1889, but only recently have the difficulties associated with their formulation been possible to overcome. The main problem has been the loss of emulsion speed that results when the exposed silver halide is dissolved by the fixation process, before development can take place. Our monobath is unlike home concoctions or old technology that failed years ago. Df96 uses a more effective processing technology (akin to D96 motion picture developer) that buffers fixing, and archival fixing agents that are more solvent and aid in breaking down the silver and redepositing it, to achieve crisp uniform grain and wide development latitude...

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Black & White Friday Sale Starts Now!

Posted by CineStill on

Order through 11/24 for BLACK & WHITE FRIDAY special pricing!

THE TRADITION OF BLACK & WHITE

To celebrate the availability of CineStill BWXX, Double-X Negative film, all black and white film and chemicals from Kodak and CineStill are on sale for Black Friday. So get your stocking stuffers now or stock up for capturing the holidays on classic B&W film, at 10% to 33% off the lowest advertised prices. 


And if you’d like to mix in some color film while warming by the fireplace or in the bright snowy daylight, be sure to add some 800Tungsten and 50Daylight in 120 or 135 format to take advantage of the FREE SHIPPING on film orders $75 or more.

Happy Holidays!

Still Silver,
-CineStill



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