News — analogue

LAB-BOX IS HERE!

Posted by CineStill on

We are excited to announce that the LAB-BOX is here and ready to order now! We have been in support of this product from day -1. It is now our privilege to assist ars-imago as their importer in the U.S., and support them at the vanguard of the analog renaissance. Our first round of fulfillment will be allocated to the backers of the successful Kickstarter campaign. After the backers have been duly rewarded for their support, we will then begin distributing orders to dealers and customers for the highly anticipated official LAB-BOX retail release date of August 1st. Inventory is limited and will be allocated on a 1st-come 1st-serve basis, so get your order in now!

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New D96 and F96 Powder 2-Bath Chemistry!

Posted by CineStill on

We are proud to introduce two brand new additions to the CineStill Chemistry Catalog: "D96” Powder B&W Motion Picture Developer, and "F96” the world’s only Powder Rapid Fixer for B&W + Bleach-Bypass Color Film!

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Artist Spotlight: Maarten Groen

Posted by CineStill on

We first discovered Maarten Groen on Instagram and quickly became huge fans of his stunning work. Shooting almost exclusively CineStill Film, he recently self published a book of images shot on our film!

For this spotlight, we simply asked Maarten to talk about shooting impactful still photographs alongside his work as a film director. Thank you Maarten for supporting CineStill and for being such a beautiful part of our film community!

Hi, I’m Maarten Groen and I’m an analog addict...

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Artist Spotlight: Ethan Gulley - Desert & Denim

Posted by CineStill on

Alabama-born and California based photographer Ethan Gulley first popped onto our radar with his bold commercial and editorial photography, and as founder of the independent publication Sonder Mag.
Ethan recently packed up a bag full of CineStill Film and headed to Joshua Tree to document Desert & Denim, a festival for entrepreneurs, artisans and idealists. The results are stunning, with a palpable sense of western nostalgia and craft flair. Thanks for taking us along on your adventure, Ethan!

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No Compromises - Df96 compared with popular traditional developers

Posted by CineStill on

Due to the long history of multiple bath processes being the only ones available, many may wonder, "What are the compromises with a monobath?" Well, we can tell you that it is not compromised quality with Df96. We are standing on the shoulders of giants, and the reason monobaths weren't popular before is most likely because of economies of scale and cost, in addition to shorter shelf life. In the past, there was more profit in just producing the large volume photochemicals for film to be processed en masse. After all, back then everyone had to process film to capture a photo. Now that craft film manufacturing is being tooled for smaller batches, lower volume products can be more viable. Small batch, on demand, chemical manufacturing works just like craft beer. Fresher product with more characteristics. Thus the modern monobath was born, formulated to be produced at a craft scale.

Df96 is very forgiving for all film speeds and different emulsion types. This is partially because of the advanced developing agents used. But also as chemical development self-completes, archival fixation takes over breaking down silver and allowing physical development to redeposit it in thin areas of the film, while diffusing the grain to be finer and smoother. As you can see in the samples below, it renders somewhere between the Ilfotec DDX grain structure and Kodak Professional HC-110 tonality.

Detail crop of BwXX processed at ISO 250 in HC-110 liquid concentrate, Df96 monobath, and D-76 powder chemicals.

Detail crop of BwXX processed at ISO 250 in DD-X liquid concentrate, Df96 monobath, and ID-11 powder chemicals. 

Df96 also works well with tabular grain films, like Tmax, but to fully eliminate residual color dyes in the emulsion we double the recommended processing time. This does not affect the image since all films complete development within the first 3 minutes. Below you can see the smoothness and crisp contrast Df96 pulls out of TMax100...

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